University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
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faculty spotlight

“The trauma-informed perspective provides a path for social workers to understand and address, at multiple levels, the experience of these populations.”

I’m intrigued by the newness of things, and the newness about education is how we will use technology: what is that going to look like, and how do we do that well?

Although we’re still learning about the impacts of trauma and trauma-informed care on individuals with addictions, there are basic human rights that as a society we ought to be talking about.

A large number of people in the populations I'm interested in working with, individuals with addictions, are tremendously impacted by trauma and trauma-informed care. Although I think we’re still learning about those kinds of impacts on people and how pervasive that impact is on development, there are basic human rights that as a society we ought to be talking about. I’ve moved much more toward talking with people in the community about treatment as a human right. Is that a basic human right? And if it is, what does that mean for individuals who are difficult and renascent about treatment, or difficult to treat, or who are problematic in the treatment environment? If it’s a human right, should our response be different?  So it’s changed some of my basic thinking about the field. The more I think about the implications of trauma, the more I understand what that means.