Buffalo Training Details

New! The Impact of Child Maltreatment on Neurodevelopment: Risk and Protective Factors

Add this training to my calendar

Date/Time: Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019, 8:45 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Location: UB, Center for Tomorrow, Flint Rd. & Maple Rd., Amherst, NY 14226
Hours: 3.0
CEUs: 3.0
Cost: $50.00
Lunch Included: No
Fulfills Hours in Trauma Certificate Program: Elective

Presenter

Dr. Rachel A. Fusco

Degrees:
PhD, MSSW

Bio:
Rachel A. Fusco, PhD, MSSW, is an associate professor at the University of Georgia School of Social Work where she is the Georgia Athletic Association Professor in Health and Well-Being. She was previously an associate professor and the chair of direct practice at the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work. Her areas of research, practice, and publications include mental health and well-being of young children and their mothers in families experiencing child maltreatment and/or intimate partner abuse; and supporting new mothers with opioid use disorders to increase treatment adherence so they can engage in loving and safe parenting. Prior to her academic work, Dr. Fusco worked as lead therapist in a residential treatment facility for adolescent girls with mental health concerns at Kerr Youth and Family Center in Portland, Oregon. She also held positions in Texas at several agencies where she provided case management and therapy to individuals in an inpatient psychiatric hospital; developed a therapeutic program for children who had been exposed to intimate partner violence; and provided family preservation services to families with substantiated cases of child abuse.

Description

Special price $50!

Babies are born with 100 billion of neurons, and early life experiences shape which neurons are eliminated and how the reaming ones get wired. The first five years of life are especially crucial to the developing brain. Stressors such as child maltreatment in early childhood can lead to long term physical and mental health problems, and may even predispose youth to engage in substance use and self-harm. However, protective factors such as a strong attachment bond with caregivers can mitigate negative outcomes in some cases. The goals of this workshop are to share the current state of research on maltreatment and neurodevelopment, to discuss the role of the attachment system in short-and long-term outcomes, and the present current best practices for working with young children and their caregivers after experiences of abuse and neglect.
This workshop, led by Dr. Rachel Fusco who has more than 20 years’ experience with this topic, will share the most up-to-date neuroscience research in a very accessible and user-friendly way. An overview of the currently evidence-based and emerging practices for children and their caregivers will also be provided.

Learning Objectives:
1. Develop an understanding of the areas of the brain impacted by early maltreatment and what their purposes are;
2. Identify how the brain experiences social threats as similar to physical threats and how this affects our responses to trauma;
3. Explain the role of caregiver attachment in mitigating or exacerbating outcomes related to maltreatment;
4. Describe how interventions such as Attachment and Bio behavioral Catch-up, Trauma-Focused Cognitive-behavioral therapy, and Child–Parent Psychotherapy can help reduce socioemotional problems and improve bonds with caregivers.

Research: Current research on this topic can be found at Google Scholar: http://bit.ly/2OPns4C

Target Audience: social workers, mental health practitioners, creative arts therapists, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, nurses, doctors, clergy, and others who are interested

Content level: beginning and intermediate

CEUs

NY Social Workers: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0001. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 3 live in-person contact hours are approved.

NY Mental Health Counselors: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0008. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 3 live in-person contact hours are approved.

NY Creative Arts Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0003. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 3 live in-person contact hours are approved.

NY Marriage and Family Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0007. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 3 live in-person contact hours are approved.

NY State OASAS Provider #0045: 3 hours approved. CASAC, CPP & CPS Renewal Hours.

ADA Accommodations: If you require any support for your ADA needs in the United States, please contact us by email at least 3 weeks prior to the event by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.

Customer Service: We are happy to respond to any concerns or questions you may have. Please contact us at by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.