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Professional development training to advance your social work and human service career

Buffalo Training Details

New! Empowering and Supporting the Engagement of Black Males in Their Own Treatment

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Date/Time: Friday, Mar. 31, 2017, 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: UB, Center for Tomorrow, Flint & Maple Rds., Amherst, NY
Hours: 6.0
CEUs: 6.0
Cost: $125.00
Discount Cost (Trauma Certificate Program participants): $115.00
Lunch Included: Yes
Fulfills Hours in Trauma Certificate Program: Elective

Presenter

Dr. Christopher St. Vil

Degrees:
PhD, MSW

Bio:
Christopher St. Vil, PhD, MSW, is an assistant professor at the University at Buffalo School of Social work. He previously worked at the University of Maryland, College Park, as a research associate and adjunct professor in the Department of African American Studies. Dr. St. Vil's current research focuses on trauma and the experiences of victims of violent injury. He is a co-investigator on a research study at the Prince George's Hospital Center Trauma Unit in Prince George's County, Maryland, examining violence and trauma among young black male victims of violent injury. His teaching and research interests also include masculinities and health, violence and trauma, cross-cohort socialization, idleness, and risk-taking attitudes.

Description

Discount price for our trauma certificate participants and graduates is $115.

“Black masculinity.” How does a Black man define what it means to “be a man”? What impact does this have on his life and interaction with human service providers? Black males of all ages are in various service systems. At times, service participation may be mandated by the courts. For voluntary services, research suggests that help-seeking by African-American males across the lifespan is significantly lower than that of their non-Black counterparts. Black males have the highest all-cause mortality rates of any racial/ethnic group in the United States; therefore, engaging and retaining them in voluntary as well as mandatory services is important to support achievement of healthy outcomes.

This presentation will cover historical trauma and the characteristics that make Black males a vulnerable population. We will apply the trauma informed guiding principles (safety; trustworthiness and transparency; peer support; collaboration and mutuality; empowerment, voice and choice; and cultural, historical, and gender Issues) into strategies to maximize the engagement of Black males in their own treatment. Content will address on how to engage Black males at varying stages of development from teens to seniors. Various biopsychosocial disparities of Black males include gender specific roles and the impact this has on engagement of Black males as well as the social construction of “Black masculinity”.

Strategies will be provided that help:
• young Black males develop a healthier sense of identity;
• support Black males in their role transition within the family if they are no longer able to identify as the “protector” or “breadwinner” and need to assume newer, nontraditional roles that help sustain family relationships;
• create therapeutic relationships and service systems that enhance help-seeking by Black males.

Learning Objectives:
• Identify the unique structural challenges impacting marginalized Black males including an overview of health disparities (health, mental health, substance use, education, incarceration, employment), and how various policies negatively impact Black males and their families;
• Recognize the characteristics and role of Black masculinity, and the impact of historical trauma in the behaviors of Black males including the impact of slavery, resilience and coping responses, and maladaptive coping responses;
• Apply developmentally appropriate approaches with Black males and recognize how the role boundaries may be blurred;
• Use specific interdisciplinary strategies including the guiding principles of trauma-informed care (safety; trustworthiness and transparency; peer support; collaboration and mutuality; empowerment, voice and choice; and cultural, historical, and gender Issues) to help increase the engagement of Black males from youth to adults in their own treatment and services.

Research: Select research references include: Treatment Disparities among African American Men with Depression: Implications for Clinical Practice at http://bit.ly/2gJOyFW; Facilitating Engagement of African American Male Adolescents in Family Therapy: A Cultural Theme Process Study at http://bit.ly/2hdFLj2; SAMHSA Trauma-Informed Approach and Trauma-Specific Interventions at http://bit.ly/2gFJKBs and http://bit.ly/2huzQm1; SAMHSA Black or African American Resource page at http://bit.ly/2d8ZG20; APA - African Americans have limited access to mental and behavioral health care at http://bit.ly/2gjwOQx.

Target Audience: social workers, mental health practitioners, creative arts therapists, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, and other interested individuals interested in learning strategies that may enhance the involvement of Black males of all ages in their own treatment and action plans.

Content level: beginning and intermediate

CEUs
New York Social Workers: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0001. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Mental Health Counselors: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0008. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Creative Arts Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0003. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0007. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York State OASASProvider #0045: 6 hours approved. CPP & CPS Initial Hours, Section 1. CASAC, CPP & CPS Renewal Hours.

ASWB ACE Credits: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education, #1312, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 7/2/2015-7/2/2018. Social workers in states other than NY should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education credits. Content level is beginning and intermediate. Social workers participating in this course will receive 6 clinical continuing education credits.

ADA Accommodations: If you require any support for your ADA needs in the United States, please contact us by email at least 3 weeks prior to the event by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.

Customer Service: We are happy to respond to any concerns or questions you may have. Please contact us at by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.