Buffalo Training Details

New! Engaging the Client Who Has Hoarding Disorder with Compassion, Empowerment & Approaches Grounded in Current Research

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Date/Time: Friday, May 25, 2018, 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: UB Center for Tomorrow, Flint & Maple Rds., Amherst, NY
Hours: 6.0
CEUs: 6.0
Cost: $135.00
Lunch Included: Yes

Presenter

Anne B. Pagano

Degrees:
LCSW, ACSW, BCD, C-ASWCM

Bio:
Anne B. Pagano, LCSW, ACSW, BCD, C-ASWCM, has over 35 years’ experience in direct care, supervision, and administration in hospitals and long-term care facilities, as well as community geriatric care management. She is the Executive Director of the Hoarding Disorder Resource and Training Group, an organization that provides continuing education and consultation to professionals, families, community groups, and task forces. Anne is also the founder of Aging Remix, an organization that provides continuing education workshops for social workers and case managers in the areas of aging, ethics, and geriatric mental health. She is a Certified Geriatric Care Manager and owner of Pagano Senior Care in Westchester, NY. Anne was an Adjunct Professor at the Fordham University School of Social Services, and has also presented at numerous national conferences. She has trained with Dr. Randy Frost, Dr. Gail Steketee, Dr. Christiana Bratiotis and Dr. C. Alec Pollard, pioneering leaders of clinical and behavioral research in Hoarding Disorder, at the Hoarding Behavior Therapy Training Institute, held at Boston University in Boston, MA.

Description

Testimonial: "Ms. Pagano's use of integrating case studies in her workshops really helps me understand how to apply the educational concepts to real life practice."

Clients with Hoarding Disorder (HD) appear in a wide variety of social service systems. HD may not be the presenting problem or even known to the service provider at the time of intake. There is often secrecy and shame shrouding this part of a person’s life. However, HD can add significant complications to their ability to maintain a home without eviction, manage finances that are being impacted by excessive spending, and maintain family and social relationships. HD may be related the individual’s trauma history. In some situations, it can present imminent risk due to self-neglect. Service providers are often challenged to engage the person in a conversation about how their life is affected by hoarding and struggle with how to move beyond their own judgements and stereotypes. It can feel overwhelming to everyone involved.

Hoarding Disorder is a complex mental health condition classified as a psychiatric disorder in the DSM-V. Behavioral indicators include excessive acquisition and extreme distress in discarding. Individuals with this disorder have a pathological attachment to their possessions, which often becomes more important to them than social relationships. They may have good or fair insight into their behavior, poor insight, or absent insight with delusional beliefs.

The primary goal of this training is to assist you in developing a knowledgeable approach to engaging in a trusting relationship with the client who has Hoarding Disorder. Those with HD are challenging to engage, as they tend to self-isolate to reduce discovery, and to avoid negative comments or shame. Whether you provide direct service in the home, community settings, or off-site clinical interventions, it is important to understand the emotional and cognitive challenges facing those with Hoarding Disorder.

The first part of this training will review research-based information regarding diagnosis and assessment, roots of etiology, neuro-cognitive functioning, and value based categories of possessions. A brief discussion of the harm reduction model of intervention, imminent risk, and the phenomenon of clutter blindness will be presented to increase your understanding of the current modalities used to remediate the hoarded enviornment. Case presentations culled from real scenarios will be used to explore how language, body language, and your own reactions can impact engagement.

The second half of the workshop will focus on exploration of clinical best practices for therapeutic interventions with a client with Hoarding Disorder. Sensitivity exercises will be used to help you appreciate the inner turmoil faced by clients, and gain cultural humility for this client population. Clinical interventions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); Motivational Interviewing (MI); Exposure therapy to reduce excessive acquisitions; Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR); and group modalities of Buried in Treasures (BIT) and Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) will all be discussed from the standpoint of Hoarding Disorder. Case scenarios and clinical dialogues will be presented to demonstrate clinical approaches and how to deal with resistance.

Learning Objectives:
• Recognize how excessive acquisitions and inability to discard are key components of hoarding disorder;
• Identify at least one value category that leads people to hoard certain items;
• Describe an informational/ categorizing processing deficit experienced by individuals with hoarding disorder;
• Apply key communication approaches during engagement phase with a new client with hoarding disorder;
• Explain at least two therapeutic counseling approaches used with hoarding clients.

Research: Content references evidenced-based research and clinical interventions, based on the pioneering works of:
Dr. Randy Frost http://bit.ly/2zKNpXT
Dr. Gail Steketee http://bit.ly/2yQu9LS
Dr. Michael Tompkins http://bit.ly/2y88Jdn
Dr. David Tolin http://bit.ly/2hgvkda

Target Audience: social workers, mental health practitioners, creative arts therapists, marriage and facility therapists, psychologists, addiction professionals, case managers, medical professionals, and other interested individuals who are involved with those who have hoarding disorders.

Content Level: beginning and intermediate

CEUs
New York Social Workers: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0001. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Mental Health Counselors: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0008. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Creative Arts Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0003. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0007. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York State OASAS addictions professionals, provider #0045: 6 hours approved. CPP Initial Hours, Section 4; CPP, CPS & CASAC Renewal Hours.

ASWB ACE Credits: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education, #1312, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 7/2/2015-7/2/2018. Social workers in states other than NY should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education credits. Content level is intermediate. Social workers participating in this course will receive 6 clinical continuing education credits.

ADA Accommodations: If you require any support for your ADA needs in the United States, please contact us by email at least 3 weeks prior to the event by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.

Customer Service: We are happy to respond to any concerns or questions you may have. Please contact us at by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.