Buffalo Training Details

New! Understanding and Helping Your High Sensation or Thrill Seeking Clients

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Date/Time: Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017, 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: University at Buffalo, Center for Tomorrow, Flint & Maple Rds., Amherst, NY
Hours: 6.0
CEUs: 6.0
Cost: $135.00
Lunch Included: Yes

Presenter

Dr. Kenneth E. Carter

Degrees:
PhD, ABPP

Bio:
Dr. Kenneth Carter is a professor of psychology at Oxford College of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia where he is actively involved in research and teaching. Dr. Carter has been a psychotherapist and researcher for more than 20 years and maintains current licensure in Georgia as a psychologist. His work has garnered awards from the National Institutes of Health, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and the University of Michigan. Before joining the faculty at Emory University, Dr. Carter served as a Senior Assistant Research Scientist in the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention where he researched smoking as a risk marker for suicidal behaviors in adolescents. In addition, he trains nationally and is actively engaged in translating research in psychology to everyday language. Dr. Carter has numerous publications and appeared on news programs such as Connect with Kids and NBC’s Today show. His new book “Buzz! Understanding Thrill Seekers and the High Sensation Seeking Personality” will be published by New Harbinger in fall 2017. His website is http://www.drkencarter.com/.

Description

Is it ADHD, PTSD, antisocial personality disorder, bipolar disorder, or just a high sensation seeking (HSS) personality that is creating challenges for your client? This training will equip you with knowledge and application strategies that you can use immediately in your practice. Sensation seeking is a trait we all have in varying levels. It includes the search for complex and new experiences. People with HSS personalities crave exotic and intense experiences, even when physical or social risks are involved. There are four types of sensation seeking: thrill-seeking, disinhibition, boredom susceptibility, and experience-seeking. Drug addictions, gambling, dangerous driving, and relationship dissatisfaction have all been linked to overly high sensation seeking tendencies (high scores in all four domains). In addition, HSS can interact with mental health conditions and impact mood, finances, and relationships. For many with HSS personalities, being unable to participate in the desired HSS activities can create symptoms of depression. Individuals who have limited financial resources may turn to inexpensive but unhealthy forms of HSS activities such as drug use, sexual promiscuity, stealing, fast driving, etc. Other HSS personalities may find it difficult to be empathetic in a relationship with someone who is uncomfortable or distressed by their behavior (“chill-seeker”); the HSS individual simply does not understand why their partner or family member is frightened by their behavior.
You will be introduced to assessment tools to identify HSS traits in your clients and discuss the related psychology and neuroscience. Direction will be provided on empowering and nonjudgmental ways to discuss high sensation seeking with your client. Techniques for grounding, healthy activities and ways to help HSS personalities improve empathy for those in their lives will be presented.

Learning Objectives:
• Explain the biological and environmental contributions to high sensation seeking as well as the current research;
• Describe the components of the HSS personality;
• Use an assessment tool to identify HSS traits;
• Analyze some common habits and hobbies of high sensation seeking clients;
• Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy sensation seeking (problematic for the client or their employer and/or family);
• Distinguish HSS from other traits and diagnoses (ADHD, PTSD, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, etc.);
• Identify select tools for meditation/mindfulness and other healthy activities to meet the needs of HSS clients.

Research: Marvin Zuckerman originally developed the concept of sensation seeking and has contributed the most important research and relevant theory (http://bit.ly/2jAf7CC). It is a growing area of research. Various recent publications can be found at Google Scholar http://bit.ly/2iaeD5E.

Target Audience: social workers, mental health practitioners, creative arts therapists, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, and other interested individuals.

Content level: intermediate

CEUs
New York Social Workers: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0001. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Mental Health Counselors: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0008. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Creative Arts Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0003. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0007. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York State OASASProvider #0045: 6 hours approved. CPP Initial Hours, Section 4. CASAC, CPP & CPS Renewal Hours.

ASWB ACE Credits: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education, #1312, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 7/2/2015-7/2/2018. Social workers in states other than NY should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education credits. Content level is intermediate. Social workers participating in this course will receive 6 clinical continuing education credits.

ADA Accommodations: If you require any support for your ADA needs in the United States, please contact us by email at least 3 weeks prior to the event by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.

Customer Service: We are happy to respond to any concerns or questions you may have. Please contact us at by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.