Buffalo Training Details

New! Self-Harm, Social Media, and Violent Games: How Do They Relate With Each Other?

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Date/Time: Monday, Jul. 24, 2017, 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: UB, Center for Tomorrow, Flint Rd. & Maple Rd., Amherst, NY
Hours: 6.0
CEUs: 6.0
Cost: $135.00
Lunch Included: Yes

Presenter

Mike Langlois

Degrees:
MSW, LICSW

Bio:
Mike Langlois, LICSW, wears many hats, from clinical social worker to public speaker to corporate consultant for Fortune 500 companies and nonprofits. He has over 20 years of experience counseling adolescents, adults and families. Mike’s theoretical background combines psychodynamic theory, contemporary cognitive and learning theory with cutting edge technologies. His work focuses on integrating gaming and social media with psychology, as well as the impact of social networks on relationships. Mike treats clients who use video games from a gamer-affirmative stance to depatholgize gaming as well as social media use. In addition to his private practice in Boston, Mike is currently an adjunct faculty member of Boston College School for Social Work and the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, and a teaching associate in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, where he supervises interns and clinicians. He also serves on the Massachusetts Commission for LGBT Youth.

Description

Technology amplifies things, it doesn’t cause them. Current research does NOT indicate that activity on social media causes self-harm. The research DOES indicate that internet and social media content related to depression, self-harm, and suicidality is very present. Content for this training primarily focuses on adolescents and young adults. When our clients are engaging in social media, gaming and internet use, professionals need to meet the client where they are at, understand it, and recognize that these tools can be used promote protective connectiveness and distract from the impulse to self-harm. (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, gaming such as Minecraft, internet-based support groups, apps for mental health support, etc.). Given how normative social media and gaming is, there may be a concern when adolescents and young adults are NOT engaged with them.
The morning will focus on providing an understanding of the definitions; relationship between self-harm, social media and violent games; research (including correlation is not causation); recognizing that bullying is the risk and ‘cyber” is a form of bullying; myths of cyberbullying, social media and gaming; how authoritative parent and family guidance around technology can help; how to avoid pathologizing use of social media and gaming; protective factors of promoting connectiveness through technology use; and other ways technology can help support mental health and reduce risk of self-harm.

The afternoon will focus on bringing the morning content into more in-depth discussion of de-identified case examples of working with individuals and/or their families, and how to initiate and manage discussion around self-harm, social media, violent games and other games.

Remember: Smartphones are distracting and distraction is an evolutionary adaption, not inherently evil; they can distract from impulse to self-harm!

Learning Objectives:
• Identify the current research findings on social media and video games, what- if any- correlations exist between them and self-harm behaviors;
• Recognize the ethical dilemma incurred by clinicians who choose not to explore social media, gaming and technology use in the lives of their clients;
• Explain to parents and family members how ‘authoritative parenting’ and related family practices can be supportive;
• Apply content implications to your work with adolescents and young adults who self-harm including how to depathologize social media and gaming use, use it to build mental health coping skills and create protective connectiveness.

Research: Research on self-harm, social media, and violent games is in an evolving state with a wide range of research looking at different aspects. Some select sources include the Pew Research Center’s Gaming and Gamers http://pewrsr.ch/1SXSpvS with a listing of teens and technology reports at http://pewrsr.ch/2mMSkFF; A Systematic Review of Social Media Use to Discuss and View Deliberate Self-Harm Acts http://bit.ly/2l2Nz9S; A Meaner, More Callous Digital World for Youth? The Relationship Between Violent Digital Games, Motivation, Bullying, and Civic Behavior Among Children http://bit.ly/2nrnhMw. A detailed reference list will be provided at the training.

Target Audience: social workers, mental health practitioners, creative arts therapists, marriage and facility therapists, psychologists, and other interested individuals.

Content level: intermediate

CEUs

New York Social Workers: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0001. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Mental Health Counselors: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. #MHC-0008. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Creative Arts Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0003. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York Marriage and Family Therapists: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0007. Full attendance is required; no partial credit will be awarded for partial attendance. 6 live in-person contact hours are approved.

New York State OASASProvider #0045: 6 hours approved. CASAC, CPP & CPS Renewal Hours.

ASWB ACE Credits: University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education, #1312, is approved as a provider for social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) www.aswb.org through the Approved Continuing Education (ACE) Program. University at Buffalo School of Social Work Office of Continuing Education maintains responsibility for the program. ASWB Approval Period: 7/2/2015-7/2/2018. Social workers in states other than NY should contact their regulatory board to determine course approval for continuing education credits. Content level is beginning and intermediate. Social workers participating in this course will receive 6 clinical continuing education credits.

ADA Accommodations: If you require any support for your ADA needs in the United States, please contact us by email at least 3 weeks prior to the event by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.

Customer Service: We are happy to respond to any concerns or questions you may have. Please contact us at by email at sw-ce@buffalo.edu or by phone at 716-829-5841.