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Summer 2017 Seated Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEU's for NY LMSW's and LCSW's are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the instructions and form at this link to request your certificate.

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SW 554 Motivational Interviewing

This course is organized primarily as a seminar that will highlight Motivational Interviewing (MI) approaches to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change behavior. This course provides a forum for case presentation and discussion with an emphasis on discussing cases from student’s field placements and/or practice settings. Theories of behavioral change will be discussed, and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of intentional behavior change will be highlighted as an integrative framework for understanding the process of behavior change.

MI is an evidence-based practice for addictive behaviors, but applications of motivational interviewing have been extended to behavioral change in general, including social work, mental health, health promotion, general medical care, corrections, and community and organizational settings. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” clients.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Mondays from 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.

May 30 - August 4, 2017

Location: 6 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 12205
Instructor: Peter Sobota
103 Clemens Hall, North Campus
103 Clemens Hall, North Campus

SW 556 Forensic Social Work

This course examines social work practice in the context of the legal and justice systems, including criminal and civil courts, child custody issues, and mandated treatment. It provides students with a broad overview of the justice system within the United States, and how that system interacts with other structures and policies to affect social workers and the populations we serve. Students will review forensic social work practice within a broad array of settings with diverse populations. Recent trends in the criminal justice system will be examined, including mass incarceration, civil commitment, the criminalization of poverty, and the so-called war on drugs. Special emphasis is placed on the disproportionate impact of these trends on marginalized communities within the United States. 

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Tuesdays from 5:30 - 9:30 p.m.

May 30 - August 4, 2017

Location: 103 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 12491
Instructor: Ronald Schoelerman

SW 577 Schema Focused Therapy for Trauma-Genic, Personality, and Co-Occurring Disorders: Understanding Lifetraps

The purpose of this course is to provide a practical knowledge of the Schema Focused Therapy Model. Students will become acquainted with the nature of each of the Lifetraps or early maladaptive schemas, their domains, the pathogenic early learning in their origin, and the ways they play out in self-defeating behaviors of the adult. An overview of the model, components of assessment, case conceptualization, and the phases of treatment will be presented. At the conclusion of this course, students will have an understanding of the model and the steps for incorporating this integrative tool for the treatment of a wide range of clients who have histories of psychological trauma and meet criteria for personality, other mental health and substance use disorders.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Wednesday and Thursday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 19 - July 20, 2017

Location: UB Center for Tomorrow, North Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12578
Instructor: Jay Swarthout

SW 591 Spirituality in Social Work

In keeping with the generalist model, as social workers we need to be exploring spiritual themes with our clients. Such exploration can offer them a source of inner strength during times of crisis. It may also help them find a sense of community based on their belief systems and give meaning to their lives even when grieving during transitions and losses. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about spirituality as a component of mental health as well as teach her/him interventions for integrating spiritual concepts into clinical practice.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Wednesdays from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m.

May 30 - August 4, 2017

Location: 103 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 12492
Instructor: Elaine Hammond

SW 599 Public School Social Work

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of Social Work Practice in the Public Schools. Students will examine the history of school social work, state and federal education laws, educational issues and policies, conceptual frameworks (such as the ecological approach), and service delivery models. Evidence-based programs, interventions and practices will be highlighted, in particular those that optimize the student's potential for growth and learning. The course is intended to develop the student's awareness and understanding of the unique role that the school social worker has and how it impacts the lives of children, families, school staff and communities.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Wednesdays from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

May 30 - August 4, 2017

Location: 4 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 12179
Instructor: Gerald Moote

SW 702 A Motivational Interviewing Approach to Client Behavior Change

This course is an introduction to the principles, strategies, and the spirit of the Motivational Interviewing (MI) approach to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change problematic behaviors. The theoretical basis of MI lies in the construct of “ambivalence” and the conflict between indulgence and restraint that is so prevalent when clients consider behavior change. The difficulty in changing problematic behaviors is an occurrence that extends well beyond “addictive behaviors.” The immobilizing effects of ambivalence can be seen in many practice spheres. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” and “resistant” clients. This course will consist of critical discussion and practical application of the material.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Wednesday and Thursday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 12 - July 13, 2017

Location: 214 Parker Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12582
Instructor: Melissa Babiarz

SW 704 Solution Focused Approaches to Difficult Client Situations

This course will focus on building solutions in a contemporary social work practice environment. By integrating solution focused approaches within the context of family-centered social work practice participants will learn clear and useful techniques to apply in their work with difficult clients. This course will consist of critical discussion and practical application of the material.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Thursday and Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 27 - July 28, 2017

Location: UB Center for Tomorrow, North Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12583
Instructor: Denise Krause

SW 705 Assessing Lethality

This is a skill focused course on how to assess and respond to adults with psychiatric emergencies where there is a risk of lethality (suicidal/homicidal/self-harm). It will include identification of high risk factors and how to conduct lethality assessments for individuals, including those who are diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness and/or under the influence of substances. Participants will learn the levels of lethality; how to use lethality assessment tools and rating scales; how to complete documentation of services which reflect clinical assessments in accordance with the most current evidence and best practices; how to create an intervention plan for identified lethality, and when it is appropriate in professional social work practice to break confidentiality based on a current lethality assessment.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Monday and Tuesday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 10 - July 11, 2017

Location: 214 Parker Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12579
Instructor: Lynda Battaglia

SW 716 Professional Writing and Documentation for Social Work Practice

This course assists students in recognizing the difference between academic writing and post-graduate writing in professional social work practice, and in mastering skills needed in a variety of current and post-graduate social work micro and macro settings (e.g., clinical work, research, program evaluation, grant writing and administration). Strong writing skills with the ability to adapt writing to different tasks and audiences is critical for social work competency and career advancement.

In this course, students will also review written work (HIPAA de-identified) from their field placements, as well as papers from coursework for logic and organization; paragraph development; transitional statements; active voice; emotional tone/word choice; and matching writing style to the task such as case notes, professional emails, funding proposals, literature reviews and client or service provider letters.

Schedule:

Saturdays from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.  

Dates June 24, July 8, and July 22, 2017

Location: 103 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 12180
Instructor: Alyssa Gross

SW 973 Cognitive Behanvior Therapy for Youth with Depression, Anxiety & Co-Morbid Conditions

This course will provide training in evidenced-based, cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for depression, anxiety, and comorbid disorders in youth. Participants will learn fundamental CBT skills including: psychoeducation; feeling awareness; mood monitoring; somatic management; mindfulness; behavioral  activation; cognitive processing & restructuring; exposure therapy; behavior chain analysis; problem solving; assertiveness training; social skills training and self-harm and suicide prevention. Techniques to engage the youth and increase motivation for counseling, as well as, methods to involve parents and families in treatment will be addressed. Family therapy techniques to enhance parent-youth communication and problem solving will be covered. Anxiety treatment will include emphasis on separation anxiety, specific phobias, social anxiety and panic disorder. Assessment and evidence based treatment of common co-morbid disorders such as PTSD, Oppositional-Defiant Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder will be reviewed.  

Prerequisites: Participants are expected to have prior experience or coursework involving clinical services for youth with mental health disorders.  

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Monday and Tuesday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 17 - July 18, 2017

Location: UB Center for Tomorrow, North Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12580
Instructor: David Pratt

SW 974 Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Values Based Behavior Change

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an evidence-based contextually focused form of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy that uses mindfulness and behavioral activation to increase clients' psychological flexibility and engage in values-based, positive behaviors while experiencing difficult thoughts, emotions, or sensations. This course focuses on the origin, theory, components, research, and application of foundation skills of ACT to help adults and adolescents from diverse populations and a variety of life problems organize their lives around what matters to them, rather than avoidance of unwanted experiences, emotions, thoughts, and body sensations. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize this method appropriately and effectively with diverse client populations and problems. 

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Thursday and Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

July 20 - July 21, 2017

Location: UB Center for Tomorrow, North Campus
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 12581
Instructor: Seaghan Coleman