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Spring 2018 Seated Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEU's for NY LMSW's and LCSW's are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the instructions and form at this link to request your certificate.

On this page:

SW 401A Black Masculinities (undergraduate)

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. 

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Lecture A

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday 10:00am-11:25am
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23965
Instructor: TBD

Lecture B

Schedule: Wednesday 9:00am to 11:50am
Location: 103 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23127
Instructor: Christopher St. Vil

Lecture C

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday 10:00am to 11:25am
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23966
Instructor: Melanie Sage

SW 554 Motivational Interviewing

This course is organized primarily as a seminar that will highlight Motivational Interviewing (MI) approaches to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change behavior. This course provides a forum for case presentation and discussion with an emphasis on discussing cases from student’s field placements and/or practice settings. Theories of behavioral change will be discussed, and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of intentional behavior change will be highlighted as an integrative framework for understanding the process of behavior change.

MI is an evidence-based practice for addictive behaviors, but applications of motivational interviewing have been extended to behavioral change in general, including social work, mental health, health promotion, general medical care, corrections, and community and organizational settings. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” clients.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Lecture A

Schedule: Monday 9:00am to 11:50am
Location: 88 Alumni Arena, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 16177
Instructor: Peter Sobota

Lecture B

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00pm to 8:50pm
Location: 317 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 16713
Instructor: Peter Sobota

SW 578 Gender Issues

This elective aims to introduce students to the theories and knowledge essential to understanding the role of gender in shaping individuals’ lives and development, interpersonal relationships and systems, and conditions of social and material inequality. Students will examine the relation of gender to universal human rights as well as diverse experiences of trauma. In addition, students will have the opportunity to consider the role of social work practice in both reifying gender as well as contesting related forms of inequality and injustice.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Monday 9:00am to 11:50am
Location: 248 Cooke Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20548
Instructor: Berg Miller

SW 584 Personality Disorders

This course focuses on people who have been characterized as having a “personality disorder.” The course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current perspectives and controversies in this area, including controversies surrounding interventions with this population.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00pm to 8:50pm
Location: 88 Alumni Arena, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14630
Instructor: Jay Swarthout

SW 586 Responding to Refugees and Immigrants

Refugees and immigrants are increasingly recognized as populations with issues and concerns of relevance to social workers. This course will cover the distinctions among immigrants, refugees, and newcomers with other immigration statuses, including their differential access to social services. A human rights framework will be utilized to examine international migration issues. The course will examine different reasons for migration (economic reasons, wars, persecution, etc.) as well as the societal context that welcomes or rejects different types of migrants. Policies related to immigration and the value foundation of these policies will be discussed. Additionally, the course will review policies and services related to resettlement in the United States, direct practice concerns, and experiences with and sequelae related to trauma. Many refugees are currently being resettled in Buffalo thus the course will examine locally relevant content as well as look at global issues.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Wednesday 2:00pm to 4:50pm
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20550
Instructor: Isok Kim

SW 588 Social Work Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Populations

This advanced practice course focuses on developing the theoretical and empirical knowledge and practice skills necessary for effective, evidence-based social work practice with gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) persons and their families. The course will cover five major domains of social work practice with GLBT persons: (a) the theoretical and empirical knowledge relevant to understanding the experiences of GLBT persons across the life span; (b) the assessment of the unique psychosocial concerns and issues presented by GLBT clients and their families-of-choice and families-of-origin, with particular attention to issues of race/ethnicity, culture, age, disability, religion, class, and physical or mental disability as they impact on sexual minority populations; (c) the identification and implementation of empirically-validated, capacity-building interventions with GLBT individuals, couples, and families; (d) the social work values, ethics and social justice concerns involved in working with GLBT persons and their families; and (e) intervention strategies for building inclusive agencies, organizations, and institutions.  Students will actively examine their own values and attitudes towards gender, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation, and their professional use of self in their practice with GLBT populations.

Schedule: Wednesday 6:00pm to 8:50pm
Location: 317 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21506
Instructor: Judy Brown

SW 591 Spirituality in Social Work

In keeping with the generalist model, as social workers we need to be exploring spiritual themes with our clients. Such exploration can offer them a source of inner strength during times of crisis. It may also help them find a sense of community based on their belief systems and give meaning to their lives even when grieving during transitions and losses. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about spirituality as a component of mental health as well as teach him/her interventions for integrating spiritual concepts into clinical practice.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Wednesday 2:00pm to 4:50pm
Location: 88 Alumni Arena, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14422
Instructor: Elaine Hammond

SW 593 EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing)

This course focuses on the origin, theory, components, research, and application of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a treatment method originally developed for treating trauma and now being applied to a range of client problems. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize this method appropriately and effectively with diverse client populations and problems. Such use is based on an understanding of the theoretical basis of EMDR, client safety issues, integration with a comprehensive treatment plan, and supervised practice with the components of EMDR as well as its various applications.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor: participants should be either students entering their last year of a professional human services degree program (e.g., MSW, MS in rehabilitation counseling), or licensed/certified mental health professionals. Credentialed providers without a graduate degree may be eligible to take the course under some conditions. All participants must have appropriate permission to utilize EMDR in their work (or internship) setting.

Apply: Students must complete both the EMDR application and an online Social Work Non-Degree Student application.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Wednesday 2:00pm to 5:20pm
Location: 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21564
Instructor: Seaghan Coleman

SW 597 Play Therapy

This course is a practice oriented elective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings. Students will become familiar with various theoretical practice models and learn to apply those models with children experiencing a variety of problems across diverse populations. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of services to children, including in mental health, child welfare, health and community based settings.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00pm to 8:50pm
Location: 319 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20900
Instructor: Rebekah Crofford

SW 599 Public School Social Work

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of Social Work Practice in the Public Schools. Students will examine the history of school social work, state and federal education laws, educational issues and policies, conceptual frameworks (such as the ecological approach), and service delivery models. Evidence-based programs, interventions and practices will be highlighted, in particular those that optimize the student's potential for growth and learning. The course is intended to develop the student's awareness and understanding of the unique role that the school social worker has and how it impacts the lives of children, families, school staff and communities.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00pm to 8:50pm
Location: 90 Alumni Arena, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 16202
Instructor: TBD

SW 708 Responding to Disasters with Social Work Interventions

Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for responding to disasters, such as floods, fires, hurricanes and major transportation accidents. Students will become oriented to trauma-informed casework, mental health interventions and shelter-based interventions that are utilized by disaster response teams, such as rapid assessment skills; enhanced psychological first-aid for survivors, staff and volunteers; and facilitation of immediate problem-solving. The course is anchored in the values and ethics of the social work profession and incorporates a human rights perspective in understanding disasters and their differential impact on vulnerable populations.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Arr Arr
Location: Arr
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 18861
Instructor: Tara Hughes

SW 710 Loss and Grief Across the Life Course

This course will focus on the central human experiences of loss, grief and bereavement that occur across the life course. Guided examination of current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in grief counseling will be conducted. This course will focus on building knowledge about the nature of grief, mourning and bereavement as it is influenced by age, developmental stage, gender, race, culture, ethnicity and social context. Familiarity with the various types of losses that occur in all age groups is germane to effective social work practice in all agency settings. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness, increased knowledge and basic skills for assessing and intervening with loss and grief in micro-, mezzo- and macrosocial domains. It will incorporate a trauma-informed and human rights perspective to social work practice with people who are adapting to loss.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Monday 2:00pm to 4:50pm
Location: 319 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19028
Instructor: Deborah Waldrop

SW 990 Black Masculinities

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. 

Schedule: Wednesday 9:00am to 11:50am
Location: 103 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21936
Instructor: Christopher St. Vil

SW 994 Restorative Justice Certificate Training

Restorative Justice (RJ) is a social justice approach towards repairing the harm, promoting positive interpersonal relationships, and building community when conflict, misconduct or criminal behavior occurs. RJ brings social justice to the criminal justice system, schools, and communities. With youth, RJ is an evidence-based approach towards improving school climate; interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects youth of color; and creating safe and supportive environments for children and youth without resorting to punitive responses.

This course is organized around the training practices of the International Institute of Restorative Practices and will result in a certificate of skills acquired issued by the institute. In this class, students will learn and practice RJ skills, particularly conducting RJ circles in schools and other community settings. It will assist in defining and implementing restorative justice techniques, while offer implementation guidelines, explaining how and why the process works. We will explore the usage of using proactive circles to create positive communities and reactive circles to manage behavior and engage people in their issues. Students with an interest in working in criminal justice settings, neighborhood community centers, schools, child welfare settings, and other organizations serving children, youth, and adults are encouraged to take this course. 

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Saturday 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 207 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 21963
Instructor: Dina Thompson