Spring 2019 Seated Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEUs for NY LMSWs and LCSWs are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the Application to Request New York LMSW & LCSW Continuing Education Hours for MSW Elective Courses to request your certificate.

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SW 140 Organizing and Advocacy (undergraduate)

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking.

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Monday,Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
Location: 352 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23272
Instructor: Lauren Merriman

SW 150 Social Media in Social Change (undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change.

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Tuesday,Thursday 5:00 p.m. to 6:20 p.m.
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23273
Instructor: Greer Hamilton

SW 230 Theories and Policies of Community Organizing and Development

This course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which the history of community organizing and development informs community theory and policy across urban and rural settings. With an emphasis on group development theory, students will be introduced to the major theories and policies that impact neighborhood/community capacity, including but not limited to theories of poverty, inequality, human rights, urban and rural community organizing and development, and neighborhood organizing. A particular focus is the intersection of these theories and policies within this framework that can create social capital and foster entrepreneurship, social innovation, and cross-sector collaboration.

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Tuesday,Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
Location: 111 Wende Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21434
Instructor: Lauren Merriman

SW 235 Responses to Child Maltreatment (undergraduate)

This course focuses on interdisciplinary system responses to child maltreatment, including trauma-informed and human rights-based approaches. The course explores responses across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.  

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
Location: 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23270
Instructor: Wendy Martin

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues (undergraduate)

This course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework.

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
Location: 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23271
Instructor: Karen Andolina Scott

SW 401 Black Masculinities (undergraduate)

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. 

Social Work graduate students -- this course will not count towards your degree requirements.

Schedule: Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23092
Instructor: Christopher St. Vil

SW 554 Motivational Interviewing

This course is organized primarily as a seminar that will highlight Motivational Interviewing (MI) approaches to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change behavior. This course provides a forum for case presentation and discussion with an emphasis on discussing cases from student’s field placements and/or practice settings. Theories of behavioral change will be discussed, and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of intentional behavior change will be highlighted as an integrative framework for understanding the process of behavior change.

MI is an evidence-based practice for addictive behaviors, but applications of motivational interviewing have been extended to behavioral change in general, including social work, mental health, health promotion, general medical care, corrections, and community and organizational settings. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” clients.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Lecture A

Schedule: Monday 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.
Location: 325 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 15646
Instructor: Peter Sobota

Lecture B

Schedule:     Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 206 Diefendorf Hall , South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 16124
Instructor: Peter Sobota

SW 556 Forensic Social Work

This course examines social work practice in the context of the legal and justice systems, including criminal and civil courts, child custody issues, and mandated treatment. It provides students with a broad overview of the justice system within the United States, and how that system interacts with other structures and policies to affect social workers and the populations we serve. Students will review forensic social work practice within a broad array of settings with diverse populations. Recent trends in the criminal justice system will be examined, including mass incarceration, civil commitment, the criminalization of poverty, and the so-called war on drugs.  Special emphasis is placed on the disproportionate impact of these trends on marginalized communities within the United States. 

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 352 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23269
Instructor: Lynda Battaglia

SW 584 Personality Disorders

This course focuses on people who have been characterized as having a “personality disorder.” The course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current perspectives and controversies in this area, including controversies surrounding interventions with this population.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 325 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14297
Instructor: Jay Swarthout

SW 588 Social Work Practice with LGBTQ Populations

This advanced practice course focuses on developing the theoretical and empirical knowledge and practice skills necessary for effective, evidence-based social work practice with gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) persons and their families. The course will cover five major domains of social work practice with GLBT persons: (a) the theoretical and empirical knowledge relevant to understanding the experiences of GLBT persons across the life span; (b) the assessment of the unique psychosocial concerns and issues presented by GLBT clients and their families-of-choice and families-of-origin, with particular attention to issues of race/ethnicity, culture, age, disability, religion, class, and physical or mental disability as they impact on sexual minority populations; (c) the identification and implementation of empirically-validated, capacity-building interventions with GLBT individuals, couples, and families; (d) the social work values, ethics and social justice concerns involved in working with GLBT persons and their families; and (e) intervention strategies for building inclusive agencies, organizations, and institutions. Students will actively examine their own values and attitudes towards gender, gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation, and their professional use of self in their practice with GLBT populations.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Wednesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23230
Instructor: Judy Brown

SW 591 Spirituality in Social Work

In keeping with the generalist model, as social workers we need to be exploring spiritual themes with our clients. Such exploration can offer them a source of inner strength during times of crisis. It may also help them find a sense of community based on their belief systems and give meaning to their lives even when grieving during transitions and losses. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about spirituality as a component of mental health as well as teach him/her interventions for integrating spiritual concepts into clinical practice.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Location: 319 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14099
Instructor: Elaine Hammond

SW 593 EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing)

This course focuses on the origin, theory, components, research, and application of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a treatment method originally developed for treating trauma and now being applied to a range of client problems. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize this method appropriately and effectively with diverse client populations and problems. Such use is based on an understanding of the theoretical basis of EMDR, client safety issues, integration with a comprehensive treatment plan, and supervised practice with the components of EMDR as well as its various applications.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor: participants should be either students entering their last year of a professional human services degree program (e.g., MSW, MS in rehabilitation counseling), or licensed/certified mental health professionals. Credentialed providers without a graduate degree may be eligible to take the course under some conditions. All participants must have appropriate permission to utilize EMDR in their work (or internship) setting.

Apply: Students must complete both the EMDR application and an online Social Work Non-Degree Student application.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Tuesday 2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.

Class will have a two preliminary sessions in 214 Parker Hall, South Campus on: 

Friday January 25, 2019

Saturday January 26, 2019

Location: 02 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20271
Instructor: Seaghan Coleman

SW 597 Play Therapy

This course is a practice oriented elective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings. Students will become familiar with various theoretical practice models and learn to apply those models with children experiencing a variety of problems across diverse populations. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of services to children, including in mental health, child welfare, health and community based settings.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19744
Instructor: Rebekah Crofford

SW 599 Public School Social Work

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of Social Work Practice in the Public Schools. Students will examine the history of school social work, state and federal education laws, educational issues and policies, conceptual frameworks (such as the ecological approach), and service delivery models. Evidence-based programs, interventions and practices will be highlighted, in particular those that optimize the student's potential for growth and learning. The course is intended to develop the student's awareness and understanding of the unique role that the school social worker has and how it impacts the lives of children, families, school staff and communities.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.
Location: 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 15669
Instructor: Gerald Moote

SW 708 Responding to Disasters with Social Work Interventions

Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for responding to disasters, such as floods, fires, hurricanes and major transportation accidents. Students will become oriented to trauma-informed casework, mental health interventions and shelter-based interventions that are utilized by disaster response teams, such as rapid assessment skills; enhanced psychological first-aid for survivors, staff and volunteers; and facilitation of immediate problem-solving. The course is anchored in the values and ethics of the social work profession and incorporates a human rights perspective in understanding disasters and their differential impact on vulnerable populations.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Class Dates: 

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Saturday, January 26, 2019

Saturday, February 2, 2019

Saturday, February 9, 2019

Saturdday, February 16, 2019

Location: 786 Delaware Ave, Buffalo NY
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 17958
Instructor: Tara Hughes

SW 710 Loss and Grief Across the Life Course

This course will focus on the central human experiences of loss, grief and bereavement that occur across the life course. Guided examination of current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in grief counseling will be conducted. This course will focus on building knowledge about the nature of grief, mourning and bereavement as it is influenced by age, developmental stage, gender, race, culture, ethnicity and social context. Familiarity with the various types of losses that occur in all age groups is germane to effective social work practice in all agency settings. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness, increased knowledge and basic skills for assessing and intervening with loss and grief in micro-, mezzo- and macrosocial domains. It will incorporate a trauma-informed and human rights perspective to social work practice with people who are adapting to loss.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Monday 2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 18105
Instructor: Deborah Waldrop

SW 716 Professional Writing and Documentation for Social Work Practice

This course assists students in recognizing the difference between academic writing and post-graduate writing in professional social work practice, and in mastering skills needed in a variety of current and post-graduate social work micro and macro settings (e.g., clinical work, research, program evaluation, grant writing, and administration). Strong writing skills with the ability to adapt writing to different tasks and audiences is critical for social work competency and career advancement.

In this course, students will also review written work (HIPAA de-identified) from their field placements, as well as papers from coursework for logic and organization; paragraph development; transitional statements; active voice; emotional tone/word choice; and matching writing style to the task such as case notes, professional emails, funding proposals, literature reviews, and client or service provider letters.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00pm
Class Dates:

February 2, 2019

February 16, 2019

March 2, 2019

Location: 129 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 23256
Instructor: Alyssa Gross

SW 722 Restorative Justice Certificate Training

Restorative Justice (RJ) is a social justice approach towards repairing the harm, promoting positive interpersonal relationships, and building community when conflict, misconduct or criminal behavior occurs. RJ brings social justice to the criminal justice system, schools, and communities. With youth, RJ is an evidence-based approach towards improving school climate; interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects youth of color; and creating safe and supportive environments for children and youth without resorting to punitive responses.

This course is organized around the training practices of the International Institute of Restorative Practices and will result in a certificate of skills acquired issued by the institute. In this class, students will learn and practice RJ skills, particularly conducting RJ circles in schools and other community settings. It will assist in defining and implementing restorative justice techniques, while offer implementation guidelines, explaining how and why the process works. We will explore the usage of using proactive circles to create positive communities and reactive circles to manage behavior and engage people in their issues. Students with an interest in working in criminal justice settings, neighborhood community centers, schools, child welfare settings, and other organizations serving children, youth, and adults are encouraged to take this course. 

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Class Dates:

March 2, 2019

March 9, 2019

March 16, 2019

March 30, 2019

Location: 207 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 22167
Instructor: Dina Thompson

SW 726 Finding Common Ground through Intergroup Dialogue

This course provides a general introduction to the knowledge and skills needed to conduct intergroup dialogue (IGD) with diverse populations. Central to this course will be the examination of systems of oppression, social identities, dynamics of power and privilege, and the interconnections among these concepts, particularly how they can fuel social division and dehumanization. Students will critically examine the theory, pedagogy, and research supporting IGD as an effective strategy to finding common ground and promoting social justice  among  diverse communities. IGD will also be considered in light of trauma-informed and human rights perspectives. Students will participate in a dialogue experience and practice facilitating IGD in select settings (e.g., community-based agencies, schools and youth development programs, faith-based organizations) through a combination of in-class and community-based experiential learning activities.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Tuesday 2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Location: 134C Greiner Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23871
Instructor: Annahita Ball 

SW 988 Social Sector Innovation

We live in a time of rapid change. The structure of social, economic and environmental components of the life of a human being are undergoing rapid changes. Change is also evident in policies, purposes and functions of public and private institutions. Population changes in the world magnify these complex societal problems. For addressing such complex social problems and dealing/coping with the impact of drastic changes in a sustainable manner, traditional responses/interventions/ programs/policies/solutions may not always be effective and sufficient. Hence, as graduates of professional programs, we need to create solutions that are innovative and sustainable— with a focus on triple bottom line where people, profit and planet benefit. Much of innovation comes at the intersection of disciplines, of sectors and from blending ideas originating from multiple sources.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore a) innovative solutions in depth to address complex social problems; b) conversion of solution concepts into workable ideas and make them sustainable. This course will also explore “social economy” that is emerging as an alternative “market place” which places increasing emphasis on the human dimension, i.e., on putting people first, giving democratic voice to beneficiaries of program/policies, and starting with individuals and relationships rather than with systems and structures for addressing wicked social problems. Students will learn about the concept of social innovation and its use in the social sector. The course emphasizes the application of creativity and design principles to target challenges faced by vulnerable populations in the social sector. Students will learn ways in which management in nonprofit human service organizations and administration in public service organizations may inhibit or facilitate the implementation and sustainability of innovative practices and programs. Using an integrative approach, the course offers students an opportunity to become familiar with tools that foster alignment between values and outcomes. Through the incorporation of experiential learning students, will develop capabilities to optimize resources and maximize effective innovation to address social sector problems

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule: Monday 2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.
Location: 322 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20563
Instructor: Gokul Mandayam

SW 990 Black Masculinities

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. 

Schedule: Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.  
Location: 207 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20506
Instructor: Christopher St. Vil

SW 997 Community Social Work in Action (Special Topic Course)

Get hands-on interdisciplinary experience in a community medical clinic setting in this independent study course!

The Lighthouse is a drop-in medical clinic that provides free, holistic routine health care and preventive services to un/under-insured adults and children on Buffalo’s East Side. It is managed and funded through the work of UB medical students. The clinic interdisciplinary team includes medical students, as well as students from other professional programs (currently social work, dentaland nutrition) to help address unmet or under-met health needs in this medically underserved community. Each student will volunteer at the clinic about 4-8 times through the semester from 6 pm to 9:30pm and attend a clinic meeting, and will meet independently with the instructor for orientation and supervision. Students will provide basic services related to support, information, and referral at the clinic. It is an excellent opportunity to learn skills in engagement, planning, and working across disciplines.

Schedule: January 28th - May 10th 2019
Location: The Lighthouse
Credit Hours: 1-3
Registration # 18064
Instructor: Todd Sage

SW 998 The Nuts and Bolts of Coalition Building

This course will examine the purpose and role of coalitions in community change. Using existing scholarship and best practices, students will examine various coalition structures, facilitation techniques, and evaluation tools that aid in effective and sustainable coalition building at a community, state, and national level.

Schedule:

Class dates:

Saturday, February 2, 2019 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday February 9, 2019 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday March 2, 2019 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday March 9, 2019 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Location: 258 Capen Hall, North Campus 
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 24091
Instructor: Greer Hamilton