Fall 2020 Seated Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEUs for NY LMSWs and LCSWs are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the Application to Request New York LMSW & LCSW Continuing Education Hours for MSW Elective Courses to request your certificate.

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SW 150 Social Media in Social Change (undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine and evaluate the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6 p.m. to 7:20 p.m.

Location: 103 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 22694
Instructor: Stephanie Sacco

SW 220 Introduction to Community Organizing & Development (undergraduate)

This course provides a general introduction to the history, organizations, strategies, and practice issues related to community organizing and development. Specifically, this course examines different types of community organizing and development approaches including, but not limited to workforce development, neighborhood revitalization, and arts and culture. Current trends and strategies for organizing residents and collaborating with community-based organizations on development initiatives are explored. This course also introduces empowerment, strengths-based, human rights, and trauma-informed perspectives as frameworks for developing, exploring, and analyzing community organizing and development efforts in urban and rural settings.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: 325 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21475
Instructors: Katie McClain-Meeder

SW 225 Perspectives on Child Maltreatment & Advocacy (undergraduate)

This course provides the foundational knowledge to understand and recognize child maltreatment in diverse settings. The course covers the historical and comparative perspectives, including a trauma-informed and human rights perspective, on child maltreatment, with an emphasis on improving outcomes for children and families. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: To be Determined
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21448
Instructors: Patricia Logan-Greene

SW 576 Assesment and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

This course offers students the opportunity to learn the skills necessary to assess and intervene in situations of child abuse and neglect. The role of social work in assessing and intervening in situations involving child maltreatment will be examined from a broad perspective, including the role of child protection; differing etiologies of abuse and neglect in families; practice implications in defining and intervening when child maltreatment is suspected or documented; the role of multi disciplinary casework; and the social, political and legal contexts of practice.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 248 Cooke Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 11736
Instructor: Gerald Moote

SW 580 Psychopathology

This course provides a general introduction to the fields of abnormal psychology and clinical psychiatry. Specifically, this course will acquaint students with the epidemiology, classification, and etiology, of the major forms of mental illness. It is the primary aim of this course to develop the student’s diagnostic skills in clinical settings. To that end, didactic emphasis will be placed not only on the study of psychopathological symptoms and behaviors, per se, but also on their manifestations in everyday life. Specific attention is paid to the ethical and social work value-related problems associated with diagnosing and labeling clients with a psychiatric disorder, and issues of race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, disabilities or illness, age and national origin as they influence the manifestations of behaviors that may be diagnosed as mental illness or affect the presentation of mental illness. Case studies and videos will be used to ensure that students have an effective working knowledge of: (a) the biological and psychosocial bases of the major mental disorders; (b) the behavioral symptomatology that characterizes them; and (c) their classification according to the American Psychiatric Association system of classification of mental illness and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD). This course also addresses the role of social workers as advocates for people with mental disorders and as environmental change agents.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 337 Bell Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 21278
Instructor: Robert Keefe

SW 710 Loss and Grief Across the Life Course

This course will focus on the central human experiences of loss, grief and bereavement that occur across the life course. Guided examination of current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in grief counseling will be conducted. This course will focus on building knowledge about the nature of grief, mourning and bereavement as it is influenced by age, developmental stage, gender, race, culture, ethnicity and social context. Familiarity with the various types of losses that occur in all age groups is germane to effective social work practice in all agency settings. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness, increased knowledge and basic skills for assessing and intervening with loss and grief in micro-, mezzo- and macrosocial domains. It will incorporate a trauma-informed and human rights perspective to social work practice with people who are adapting to loss.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.

Location: To be Determined
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19234
Instructor: Nurit Fischer

SW 718 Core Concepts in Child and Adolescent Trauma

This course will introduce students to the core concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), which informs evidence-based assessment and intervention with traumatized children and adolescents. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification of protective and promotive factors that foster resiliency and post-traumatic growth. Trauma is broadly defined, and includes children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma, and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g., domestic violence) and other traumatic events. The course will highlight the role of development, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents and their families. It will address the level of functioning of primary care given environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

Schedule: 

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 127A Cooke Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 24298
Instructor: Sue Green

SW 722 Restorative Justice Certificate Training

Restorative justice (RJ) is a social justice approach toward repairing the harm, promoting positive interpersonal relationships and building community when conflict, misconduct or criminal behavior occurs. RJ brings social justice to the criminal justice system, schools, and communities. With youth, RJ is an evidence-based approach toward improving school climate; interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects youth of color; and creating safe and supportive environments for children and youth without resorting to punitive responses. 

In this class students will learn about RJ and practice skills in conducting RJ circles in school, criminal justice system, and community setting with children, youth and adults. Students with an interest in working in criminal justice settings, neighborhood community centers, schools, child welfare settings and other organizations serving children, youth, and adults are encouraged to take this course.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - Decemeber 11, 2020

Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Class Dates: To be Determined

Location: 103 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 20360
Instructor: Dina Thompson

SW 977 Special Topics: Understanding Suicide

Suicide is a serious public health crisis, a preventable cause of mortality and is frequently encountered in social work practice. This course will review the major aspects of suicide assessment, prevention, intervention and management to assist social workers to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to respond to the needs of affected populations.

The course will review the dominant theories of suicide and various models of suicide prevention; provide knowledge on the epidemiology of suicide; identify high risk populations; and focus on risk and protective factors associated with suicide.

Upon completion of this course, students will have gained knowledge and skills necessary to identify and intervene with persons at risk for suicide. Students will learn various evidence-based practices and tools specific to Suicide Assessment, and evaluate tools available for the assessment of suicide risk. Students will also learn to critically evaluate national, state and local strategies for suicide prevention.

Schedule:

August 31, 2020 - December 11, 2020

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 205 Diefendorf Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 24067
Instructor: Lynda Battaglia