University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
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Hilary Weaver

Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

"Whether it’s a substance abuse, nursing home or child welfare issue, I’m always interested in how the cultural piece fits with helping people. With its many ethnic populations, Buffalo is a great place to work. The social work profession has a mission to work with disenfranchised populations and that includes being culturally responsive."

Contact Information

624 Baldy Hall
Amherst, NY 14260
Phone: 716-645-1226
Fax: 716-645-3456
Email: hweaver@buffalo.edu

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Contact Information

624 Baldy Hall, Amherst, NY 14260 (view map)
Phone: 716-645-1226; Fax: 716-645-3456
Email: hweaver@buffalo.edu

Education

  • DSW, Social Work, Columbia University (1994)
  • MS, Social Work, Columbia University (1986)
  • BA, Social Work, Antioch College (1984)

Professional/Research Interests

Multicultural social work; indigenous populations and refugees

Biography

Hilary N. Weaver, DSW, is a professor and associate dean for Academic Affairs in the SUNY University at Buffalo School of Social Work. She received her BA in social work with a focus in cross-cultural studies from Antioch College and her MSW and DSW from Columbia University. Her teaching, research and service focus on cultural issues in the helping process with an emphasis on indigenous populations. Weaver has received funding from the National Cancer Institute to develop and test a culturally-grounded wellness curriculum for urban Native American youth, the Healthy Living in Two Worlds program. She is a member of NASW and CSWE and currently serves as President of the American Indian Alaska Native Social Work Educators’ Association. Weaver has presented her work regionally, nationally and internationally including presenting at the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the United Nations in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2013. She has numerous publications including Explorations in Cultural Competence: Journeys to the Four Directions (2005) and an edited book, Social Issues in Contemporary Native America: Reflections from Turtle Island (2014).