Assistant Professor Noelle St. Vil and colleagues publish, "A Qualitative Study of Black Married Couples’ Relationships With Their Extended Family Networks"

Published January 2, 2019

Noelle St. Vil

Congratulations to Assistant Professor Noelle St. Vil and colleagues on the publication of their article, "A Qualitative Study of Black Married Couples’ Relationships With Their Extended Family Networks."

St. Vil, N.M., McDonald, K.B., & Cross-Barnett, C. (2018). A Qualitative Study of Black Married Couples’ Relationships with their Extended Family Networks. Families in Society

Abstract

Historically extended family networks have been identified as contributing to the resiliency of Black families. However, little is known about how extended family networks impact the lives of Black married couples. What we do know largely stems from quantitative research. Using a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews, we examine extended family network relationships among 47 Black couples from the Contemporary Black Marriage Study who had been married for more than 5 years. Black married couples’ relationship with extended family networks affects the marriage through the following acts: (a) extended family living, (b) childcare, (c) advice and emotional support, and (d) interfamilial conflict. The four themes influenced Black marriages in various ways. This study has implications for social workers working with married couples.