Assistant Professor Elizabeth Bowen and colleagues publish article, "Risk and resilience among young adults experiencing homelessness: A typology for service planning"

Published July 23, 2018

Elizabeth Bowen

Congratulations to Assistant Professor Elizabeth Bowen and colleagues on the publication of their article, "Risk and resilience among young adults experiencing homelessness: A typology for service planning," in Children and Youth Services Review.

Narendorf, S. C., Bowen, E., Santa Maria, D., & Thibaudeau, E. (2018). Risk and resilience among young adults experiencing homelessness:  A typology for service planning. Children and Youth Services Review.

Abstract

This study examined risk and resilience indicators in a sample of young adults experiencing homelessness to identify subgroups with different service needs.

Data came from a 2014 survey of homeless young adults (age 18–24) in Houston (n = 374). Participants self-reported risk and resilience indicators which were used to fit a latent class model.

A four-class solution was the best fit. Group-1 (n = 73), had high adult support and low trauma. Group-2 (n = 60) had low trauma but low adult support. Group-3 (n = 151), had high trauma exposure, high rates of mental health problems and low substance use. Group-4 (n = 90), had high rates across all risk variables.

Trauma, adult support, and substance use were key distinguishing features to inform screening and service planning.