Assistant Professor Annahita Ball, Dr. Eugene Maguin and colleagues publish, "Impact of Individual Education Plans on academic success of youth with Early Onset Schizophrenia"

Published October 16, 2018

Annahita Ball

Eugene Maguin

Eugene Maguin

Congratulations to Assistant Professor Annahita Ball, Emeritus Associate Professor Barbara Rittner, PhD alum Ya-Ling Chen and Dr. Eugene Maguin on the publication of their article, "Impact of Individual Education Plans on academic success of youth with Early Onset Schizophrenia," in the Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work.

Ball, A., Rittner, B., Chen, Y. & Maguin, E. (2018). Impact of Individual Education Plans on academic success of youth with Early Onset Schizophrenia. Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work.

Abstract:

Purpose: Youth with early onset schizophrenia (EOS) are eligible for an individualized education plan (IEP) in school settings, yet often have declining academic performance over time. This study examines the impact of IEP and comorbid conditions on educational outcomes for youth with EOS. Method: We used mixed models and logistic regression to answer the research questions using data from 129 youth with EOS who participated in a longitudinal study from 1998 to 2006. Results: Not all children had an IEP in all waves. Of those that did, findings demonstrated that having an IEP did not improve absenteeism or academic performance. In addition, regardless of whether they had an IEP, rates of dropping out were equal. Conclusions: Social workers should consider more individualized approaches to IEPs for youth with EOS to target the specific complexities of the disorder as well as its implications for school success.