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Molly Wolf, PhD '14, Rebecca Eliseo-Arras, PhD '16, Research Professor Tom Nochajski and co-authors publish, “This Will Help Your Children”: Service Providers’ Experiences with Military Families During Cycles of Deployment

Published March 13, 2017

Molly Wolf
Rebecca Eliseo-Arras
Tom Nochajski

Congratulations to PhD alumni Molly Wolf, PhD '14, Rebecca Eliseo-Arras, PhD '16, Research Professor Tom Nochajski and co-authors on the publication of their article, “This Will Help Your Children”: Service Providers’ Experiences with Military Families During Cycles of Deployment, in the Journal of Family Social Work.

Wolf, M. R., Eliseo-Arras, R. K., Brenner, M., Turner, D., & Nochajski, T. H. (2016). “This Will Help Your Children”: Service Providers’ Experiences with Military Families During Cycles of Deployment. Journal of Family Social Work.

Abstract:

Military families face not only the same challenges as other families, but also unique issues due to their military involvement. Parenting programs for civilian families can be helpful, but they do not generally cover the specific issues faced by military families. The purpose of this qualitative study was to gather information from a focus group of eight service providers about the types of issues that affect military families, such that content and delivery of workshops at a social service agency could be formed to specifically cater to military families. This study utilized a phenomenological approach, and analyses revealed areas for social service involvement around the cycle of deployment. Specifically, social services could be helpful by using psychoeducational and normalization techniques around the five major themes that resulted from this study: (1) the issues of servicemembers psychologically withdrawing before deployment, (2) family cohesion and connectedness during and after deployment, (3) family stability during reintegration of the service member, (4) military families experience many of the same challenges that nonmilitary families do (such as domestic violence and financial issues), and (5) utilizing a military culture framework for all military family programs.