Child Advocacy Undergraduate Courses

heart in mother and child's hands

We are offering three child advocacy courses that are open to undergraduate students from any major, and are intended to prepare students in their future careers to recognize and respond to child maltreatment. They may be taken as a set or as stand-alone courses (except for SW 235). These courses are geared towards students who plan on any career that involves working with children or families, including nursing, education, human services, medicine, law, or psychology.

Courses and Descriptions

SW 225 Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy (offered Fall 2018)
Registration #24431
Monday and Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. - 11:20 a.m. in 116B Greiner Hall, North Campus

This course provides the foundational knowledge to understand and recognize child maltreatment in diverse settings. The course covers the historical and comparative perspectives, including a trauma-informed and human rights perspective, on child maltreatment, with an emphasis on improving outcomes for children and families. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.

SW 235 Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment* (offered Spring 2019)

This course focuses on interdisciplinary system responses to child maltreatment, including trauma-informed and human rights-based approaches. The purpose of this course is to expand the students’ knowledge of and skills in responding to child maltreatment. The course explores responses across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.

*Requires completion of SW 225

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues (offered Spring 2019)

The course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework.

Contact

Questions about these courses? Please contact Assistant Professor Patricia Logan-Greene at (716) 645-1533 or pblogang@buffalo.edu.