Fall 2019 Seated Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEUs for NY LMSWs and LCSWs are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the Application to Request New York LMSW & LCSW Continuing Education Hours for MSW Elective Courses to request your certificate.

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SW 140 Organizing & Advocacy (undergraduate)

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking. Likewise, they will examine and evaluate the impact these engagement activities and strategies have on access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Monday and Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: 134B Farber Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 24280
Instructor: Lauren Merriman

SW 150 Social Media in Social Change (undergraduate)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine and evaluate the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 6:20 p.m.

Location: 213 Norton Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 24281
Instructor: Greer Hamilton

SW 220 Introduction to Community Organizing & Development (Undegraduate)

This course provides a general introduction to the history, organizations, strategies, and practice issues related to community organizing and development. Specifically, this course examines different types of community organizing and development approaches including, but not limited to workforce development, neighborhood revitalization, and arts and culture. Current trends and strategies for organizing residents and collaborating with community-based organizations on development initiatives are explored. This course also introduces empowerment, strengths-based, human rights, and trauma-informed perspectives as frameworks for developing, exploring, and analyzing community organizing and development efforts in urban and rural settings.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: 182 Farber Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 22770
Instructors: Katie McClain-Meeder & Michael Lynch

SW 225 Perspectives on Child Maltreatment & Advocacy (undergraduate)

This course provides the foundational knowledge to understand and recognize child maltreatment in diverse settings. The course covers the historical and comparative perspectives, including a trauma-informed and human rights perspective, on child maltreatment, with an emphasis on improving outcomes for children and families. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 22740
Instructors: Patricia Logan-Greene

SW 309 Developing Leadership in Communities (undergraduate)

This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within neighborhoods and communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition and application of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by neighborhood and community residents. Likewise, they will explore the mechanisms that support opportunities for collaboration across social, political, legal, and financial systems and the communication patterns that influence success.

Pre-requisite: COM202 Intercultural Communication or COM225 Interpersonal Communication

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 p.m. to 7:20 p.m.

Location: 138 Bell Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23696
Instructors: Joseph Bieron

SW 580 Psychopathology

This course provides a general introduction to the fields of abnormal psychology and clinical psychiatry. Specifically, the course intends to acquaint the students with the epidemiology, classification, etiology and treatment of the major forms of mental illness. It will be the primary aim of this course to develop the student’s diagnostic skills in clinical settings. To that end, didactic emphasis will be placed not only upon the study of psychopathological symptoms and behavior per se, but also upon their manifestations in everyday life. Case studies and audio-visual tape records of interviews with actual patients will be made an integral part of the course.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Tuesdays from 6 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 328 Millard Fillmore Academic Complex, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 22370
Instructor: Robert Keefe

SW 710 Loss and Grief Across the Life Course

This course will focus on the central human experiences of loss, grief and bereavement that occur across the life course. Guided examination of current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in grief counseling will be conducted. This course will focus on building knowledge about the nature of grief, mourning and bereavement as it is influenced by age, developmental stage, gender, race, culture, ethnicity and social context. Familiarity with the various types of losses that occur in all age groups is germane to effective social work practice in all agency settings. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness, increased knowledge and basic skills for assessing and intervening with loss and grief in micro-, mezzo- and macrosocial domains. It will incorporate a trauma-informed and human rights perspective to social work practice with people who are adapting to loss.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Tuesdays from 2 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.

Location: 134B Farber Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19849
Instructor: Nurit Fischer

SW 716 Professional Writing and Documentation for SW Practice

This course assists students in recognizing the difference between academic writing and postgraduate writing in professional social work practice and in mastering skills needed in a variety of current and post-graduate social work micro and macro settings (e.g., clinical work, research, program evaluation, grant writing and administration). Strong writing skills with the ability to adapt writing to different tasks and audiences is critical for social work competency and career advancement. In this course, students will also review written work (HIPAA de-identified) from their field placements, as well as papers from coursework for logic and organization; paragraph development; transitional statements; active voice; emotional tone/word choice; and matching writing style to the task such as case notes, professional emails, funding proposals, literature reviews and client or service provider letters.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Class Dates: TBD

Location: 146 Park Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 23754
Instructor: Alyssa Gross

SW 722 Restorative Justice Certificate Training

Restorative justice (RJ) is a social justice approach toward repairing the harm, promoting positive interpersonal relationships and building community when conflict, misconduct or criminal behavior occurs. RJ brings social justice to the criminal justice system, schools, and communities. With youth, RJ is an evidence-based approach toward improving school climate; interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects youth of color; and creating safe and supportive environments for children and youth without resorting to punitive responses. 

In this class students will learn about RJ and practice skills in conducting RJ circles in school, criminal justice system, and community setting with children, youth and adults. Students with an interest in working in criminal justice settings, neighborhood community centers, schools, child welfare settings and other organizations serving children, youth, and adults are encouraged to take this course.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

September 21, 2019 - October 19, 2019

Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Class Dates:

9/21/2019 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

9/28/2019 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

10/05/2019 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

10/19/2019 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Location: 106 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 21198
Instructor: Dina Thompson

SW 997 Special Topics, Community Social Work in Action

Get hands-on interdisciplinary experience in a community medical clinic setting in this independent study course!

The Lighthouse is a drop-in medical clinic that provides free, holistic routine health care and preventive services to un/under-insured adults and children on Buffalo’s East Side. It is managed and funded through the work of UB medical students. The clinic interdisciplinary team includes medical students, as well as students from other professional programs (currently social work, dentaland nutrition) to help address unmet or under-met health needs in this medically underserved community. Each student will volunteer at the clinic about 4-8 times through the semester from 6 pm to 9:30pm and attend a clinic meeting, and will meet independently with the instructor for orientation and supervision. Students will provide basic services related to support, information, and referral at the clinic. It is an excellent opportunity to learn skills in engagement, planning, and working across disciplines.

Schedule:

August 26, 2019 - December 6, 2019

Class Dates: TBD

Location: The Lighthouse 
Credit Hours: 1-3
Registration # 22448
Instructor: Todd Sage