Spring 2023 Seated and Hybrid Electives

Continuing Education Information

CEUs for NY LMSWs and LCSWs are available for select MSW elective courses. Upon completion of your course, you may use the Application to Request New York LMSW & LCSW Continuing Education Hours for MSW Elective Courses to request your certificate.

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SW 130 Black Lives Matter: Building Racial Justice and Solidarity (Undergraduate)

This foundational course examines historic and contemporary anti-Black racism and white supremacy in the United States. Students will analyze policies and strategies to identify, challenge, and transform the values, structures, and behaviors that perpetuate systemic racism, white supremacy and anti-blackness. Students will also engage in self-reflection, develop self-awareness, and participate in critical analysis of systems of privilege and oppression, as well develop personal strategies for becoming antiracist and facilitating change in communities and society.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays & Thursdays from 2:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

Location: 210 O'Brian Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 22123
Instructor: Cheney Brockington

SW 140 Power to the People: Introduction to Organizing and Advocacy Strategies (Undergraduate Hybrid)

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking. Likewise, they will examine and evaluate the impact these engagement activities and strategies have on access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays & Thursdays from 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 p.m.

Seated Dates: 

1/31

2/2

2/14

2/16

2/28

3/2

3/14

3/16

3/28

3/30

4/11

4/13

4/25

4/27

5/9

5/11

Location: 104 Parker Hall, South Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 20299
Instructor: Lauren Merriman

SW 230 Theories and Policies of Community Organizing (Undergraduate Hybrid)

This course will explore legal and policy developments pertaining to climate change. Approaches considered will range in jurisdictional scale, temporal scope, policy orientation, regulatory target, and regulatory objective. Although course readings and discussion will focus on existing and proposed responses to climate change, the overarching aim of the course will be to anticipate how the climate change problem will affect our laws, our organizations, and our lives in the long run. This course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which the history of community organizing and development informs community theory and policy across urban and rural settings. With an emphasis on group development theory, students will be introduced to the major theories and policies that impact neighborhood/community capacity, including but not limited to theories of poverty, inequality, human rights, urban and rural community organizing and development, and neighborhood organizing. A particular focus is the intersection of these theories and policies within this framework that can create social capital and foster entrepreneurship, social innovation, and cross-sector collaboration.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Mondays & Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location:

216 Norton Hall, North Campus

12-15 hours of service learning in the community will take the place of some classroom sessions.

Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19649
Instructors: Laura Lewis

SW 235 Do we really care about kids? Rethinking child welfare in the U.S. (Undergraduate)

This course focuses on community responses to child maltreatment and the clashes between the current structures, societal values, and investment in child wellbeing. The course explores responses, including trauma-informed and human rights approaches, across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, social safety nets, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for students across many majors, including students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education.

Prerequisite:  SW 225 Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Mondays and Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to 10:50 a.m.

Location: 143 Park Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 18674
Instructors: Wendy Martin

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues (Undergraduate)

The course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

Location: 204 Clemens Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 18675
Instructors: Sarah Richards-Desai

SW 309 Developing Leadership in Communities (Undergraduate Hybrid)

This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within neighborhoods and communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition and application of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by neighborhood and community residents. Likewise, they will explore the mechanisms that support opportunities for collaboration across social, political, legal, and financial systems and the communication patterns that influence success.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:00 p.m. to 7:20 p.m.

In-Person Class Dates: 

January 30

February 1, 13, 15, 27

March 1, 15, 27

April 10, 12, 24, 26

May 8, 10

Location: 260 Capen Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 19650
Instructors: Joseph Bieron

SW 401 Black Men: A Historical and Contemporary Discourse 1619-Present (Undergraduate)

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Wednesdays from 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

Location: 240 Capen Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23364
Instructors: Christopher St. Vil

SW 554 Motivational Interviewing

This course is organized primarily as a seminar that will highlight Motivational Interviewing (MI) approaches to help clients build commitment and reach a decision to change behavior. This course provides a forum for case presentation and discussion with an emphasis on discussing cases from student’s field placements and/or practice settings. Theories of behavioral change will be discussed, and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of intentional behavior change will be highlighted as an integrative framework for understanding the process of behavior change.

MI is an evidence-based practice for addictive behaviors, but applications of motivational interviewing have been extended to behavioral change in general, including social work, mental health, health promotion, general medical care, corrections, and community and organizational settings. In addition, the course will discuss MI’s application to practice with “mandated” clients.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Lecture A

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Mondays from 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

Location: 328 Academic Center, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14561
Instructor: Peter Sobota

Lecture B

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2022

Tuesday from 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 117 Baldy Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14883
Instructor: Peter Sobota

SW 556 Forensic Social Work

This course examines social work practice in the context of the legal and justice systems, including criminal and civil courts, child custody issues, and mandated treatment. It provides students with a broad overview of the justice system within the United States, and how that system interacts with other structures and policies to affect social workers and the populations we serve. Students will review forensic social work practice within a broad array of settings with diverse populations. Recent trends in the criminal justice system will be examined, including mass incarceration, civil commitment, the criminalization of poverty, and the so-called war on drugs. Special emphasis is placed on the disproportionate impact of these trends on marginalized communities within the United States. 

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays from 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 248 Cooke Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 18673
Instructor: Lynda Battaglia

SW 584 Personality Disorders

This course focuses on people who have been characterized as having a “personality disorder.” The course is designed to provide students with an overview of historical and current perspectives and controversies in this area, including controversies surrounding interventions with this population.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays from 6:00 p.m.- 8:50 p.m.

Location: 111 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 13508
Instructor: Jay Swarthout

SW 593 EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing)

This course focuses on the origin, theory, components, research, and application of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), a treatment method originally developed for treating trauma and now being applied to a range of client problems. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to utilize this method appropriately and effectively with diverse client populations and problems. Such use is based on an understanding of the theoretical basis of EMDR, client safety issues, integration with a comprehensive treatment plan, and supervised practice with the components of EMDR as well as its various applications.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor: participants should be either students entering their last year of a professional human services degree program (e.g., MSW, MS in rehabilitation counseling), or licensed/certified mental health professionals. Credentialed providers without a graduate degree may be eligible to take the course under some conditions. All participants must have appropriate permission to utilize EMDR in their work (or internship) setting.

Apply: Students must complete both the EMDR application, and an online Social Work Non-Degree Student application if not currently a matriculated student.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays 2:00 p.m.- 4:50 p.m.

Class will have a two preliminary sessions in 214 Parker Hall, South Campus: 

January 20, 2023 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

January 21, 2023 8:00 a.m to 4:00 p.m.

Location: 109 Baldy Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 23427
Instructor: Julia Parker

SW 597 Play Therapy (Online)

This course is a practice oriented elective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings. Students will become familiar with various theoretical practice models and learn to apply those models with children experiencing a variety of problems across diverse populations. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of services to children, including in mental health, child welfare, health and community based settings.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Thursday 6:00 p.m.- 8:50 p.m.

Locations: To be Determined
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 17071
Instructor: Marcella Moslow

SW 599 Public School Social Work

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of Social Work Practice in the Public Schools. Students will examine the history of school social work, state and federal education laws, educational issues and policies, conceptual frameworks (such as the ecological approach), and service delivery models. Evidence-based programs, interventions and practices will be highlighted, in particular those that optimize the student's potential for growth and learning. The course is intended to develop the student's awareness and understanding of the unique role that the school social worker has and how it impacts the lives of children, families, school staff and communities.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Tuesdays 6:00 p.m.- 8:50 p.m.

Location: 214 OBrian Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 14579
Instructor: Gerald Moote

SW 710 Loss and Grief Across the Life Course

This course will focus on the central human experiences of loss, grief and bereavement that occur across the life course. Guided examination of current theories, research and evidence based practice(s) in grief counseling will be conducted. This course will focus on building knowledge about the nature of grief, mourning and bereavement as it is influenced by age, developmental stage, gender, race, culture, ethnicity and social context. Familiarity with the various types of losses that occur in all age groups is germane to effective social work practice in all agency settings. This course is designed to provide students with greater awareness, increased knowledge and basic skills for assessing and intervening with loss and grief in micro-, mezzo- and macrosocial domains. It will incorporate a trauma-informed and human rights perspective to social work practice with people who are adapting to loss.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Wednesdays 6:00 p.m. to 8:50 p.m.

Location: 138 Bell Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 3
Registration # 15993
Instructor: Glenn Frost

SW 722 Restorative Justice Certificate Training

Restorative justice (RJ) is a social justice approach toward repairing the harm, promoting positive interpersonal relationships and building community when conflict, misconduct or criminal behavior occurs. RJ brings social justice to the criminal justice system, schools, and communities. With youth, RJ is an evidence-based approach toward improving school climate; interrupting the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects youth of color; and creating safe and supportive environments for children and youth without resorting to punitive responses. 

In this class students will learn about RJ and practice skills in conducting RJ circles in school, criminal justice system, and community setting with children, youth and adults. Students with an interest in working in criminal justice settings, neighborhood community centers, schools, child welfare settings and other organizations serving children, youth, and adults are encouraged to take this course.

This course is approved for CEU's.

Schedule:

January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023

Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Class dates:

February 4, 2023

February 11, 2023

March 4, 2023

March 11, 2023

Location: 260 Capen Hall, North Campus
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 18166
Instructor: Andrew Prinzing

SW 728 Public Health Social Work in Action

In this inter-professional course, students work alongside students from other health professions at community-based clinics and other settings working toward racial equity in the delivery of basic healthcare services. Students may be working with students from other university schools or departments to conduct assessments, provide psychosocial information, coordinate services and advocate for the community. Students will utilize social work skills learned in classroom and field education, including a trauma-informed and human rights lens, to assess the macro forces that impact health and health care in economically challenged neighborhoods.

Schedule: January 30, 2023 - May 12, 2023
Location: The Lighthouse 
Credit Hours: 1-2
Registration # 21832
Instructor: Todd Sage

SW 990 Black Men: A Historical and Contemporary Discourse 1619-Present

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course.

Schedule:

January 31, 2022 - May 13, 2022

Wednesdays from 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

Location: 240 Capen Hall, North Campus
Credit hours: 3
Registration # 20466
Instructors: Christopher St. Vil